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Brown Bag seminar in Economics | Misperceived Returns to Active Investing with Ole-Andreas Elvik Næss

5/16/2022, 12:05 PM - 1:00 PM
Welcome to the Brown Bag Seminar in Economics organized by the Department of Economics, SSE. The seminar speaker is Ole-Andreas Elvik Næss, NHH, presenting "Misperceived Returns to Active Investing: Evidence From a Field Experiment Among Retail Investors". We conduct a field experiment with a sample of retail investors. Treated respondents are 17.4 percentage points more likely to think that index funds will outperform active funds in the future. Our main result is that treated respondents increase the index fund share of their portfolio by 4.6 percentage points (39 percent) relative to control group respondents.

Brown Bag seminar | Merger and Advertising in the Pharmaceutical Industry with Gosia Majewska

5/23/2022, 12:05 PM - 1:00 PM
Welcome to the Brown Bag Seminar in Economics organized by the Department of Economics, SSE. The seminar speaker is Gosia Majewska, Toulouse School of Economics (ENTER), presenting "Merger and Advertising in the Pharmaceutical Industry". We study how price and advertising strategies change when firms merge in pharmaceutical markets in the US. Using some known value of the sensitivity of innovation to profits, we evaluate the welfare effects of such merger, accounting for the induced welfare value of future innovation in the trade-off between short run consumer surplus and long run innovation.

Brown Bag seminar | Inferring neighborhood rates of uncaptured crime suspects: Potential crime communities in Medellin with Alejandro Puerta

5/30/2022, 12:05 PM - 1:00 PM
Welcome to the Brown Bag Seminar in Economics organized by the Department of Economics, SSE. The seminar speaker is Alejandro Puerta (ENTER) presenting "Inferring neighborhood rates of uncaptured crime suspects: Potential crime communities in Medellin." We exploit a novel dataset consisting of confidential reports of residential addresses at the moment of capture of a suspect of a crime, so as to identify neighborhoods where relatively more suspects live. We find that `"crime communities'' depend both on the crime typology and time.