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Prof Emer Sven-Erik Sjöstrand officially launched his most recent study and book “Ägarstyrning"

11 April 2023
On Thursday March 30, Professor Emeritus at the Stockholm School of Economics, Sven-Erik Sjöstrand, officially launched his most recent study and book “Ägarstyrning, en närstudie av ägarnas insatser och handlingsutrymmen i de stora svenska företagen”. The book was highlighted at a well-attended event in the aula followed by networking, drinks and light refreshments in the atrium.

Birth versus worth: how does the Indian caste system affect entrepreneurship?

09 February 2023
Misallocation of resources explains much of the productivity differences across countries, but the role of informal institutions in this misallocation has been little documented. In a recently published paper, Sampreet Goraya, Assistant Professor at the Department of Economics, brings evidence that the Indian caste system has a distortionary effect on capital and talent allocation in the economy.

Mapping and contesting peer selection in digitalized public sector benchmarking

16 September 2022
New research from the Department of Accounting explores how digitalization influence the peer selection process in public sector benchmarking.

The productive accountant as (un-)wanted self: Realizing the ambivalent role of productivity measures in accountants’ identity work

23 August 2022
A new study explores the identity-related challenges that accountants with a strong business partner identity might face when being confronted with strict productivity measures.

Media coverage and pandemic behaviour: Evidence from Sweden

22 August 2022
Sweden has attracted a lot of interest as one of few countries that did not impose mandatory lockdowns or curfews in response to the Covid-19 pandemic. New research studies show local Swedish media in this environment affect individual behavior. Read the latest SITE working paper where researchers Marcel Garz (Jönköping University) and Maiting Zhuang (SITE), investigate the effects of media coverage on compliance with public health recommendations during the Covid-19 pandemic in Sweden.

I’ll pay you later: Sustaining relationships under the threat of expropriation

21 June 2022
SITE and NES (New Economic School) researchers investigate how multinational firms manage their relationships with governments under the threat of expropriation. Exploring micro data from the oil and gas industry worldwide, they show that the multinationals delay investment, production and tax payments by more than five years in countries with weak institutions relative to countries with strong ones. These findings are consistent with the theory suggesting that delaying rents to the government in absence of formal enforcement could decrease the risk of expropriation.

Domestic violence legislation - Awareness and support in Latvia, Russia and Ukraine

10 June 2022
SITE and FREE Network researchers investigate the factors that correlate with awareness and support for domestic violence legislation in Latvia, Russia and Ukraine, three countries that introduced recent reforms. The working paper is based on a cross-country survey on perceptions and prevalence of domestic and gender-based violence conducted within the FROGEE project.

Artificial intelligence both substitutes and complements human capabilities

01 June 2022
The best possible future for integrating artificial intelligence (AI) into the workplace sees AI- related skills like data science being paired with quintessential human skills such as creativity, empathy, and interpersonal communication. This according to a new study from the Stockholm School of Economics, Copenhagen Business School, and the University of Geneva.

Business school education, motivation, and young adults' stock market participation

11 April 2022
New research from Department of Accounting faculty examines whether business school education increases students’ stock market participation.

Trading favors? UN security council membership and subnational favoritism in aid recipients

23 March 2022
SITE researchers Maria Perrotta Berlin and Anders Olofsgård together with SITE research affiliated faculty Raj M. Desai (Georgetown University and Brookings Institution) examine the effect of a country's membership in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) on the subnational distribution of World Bank aid. They find support for the hypothesis that aid recipient governments are better able to utilize aid flows for political favoritism during periods in which they are of geo-strategic value to major donors.