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FOR STAFF

Read more about the most frequently asked questions and guidelines for staff working from home and those on sick leave here.

FOR STAFF

Return to campus

  • How is SSE planning for a return to work on campus?
    • On May 29, 2020, Swedish authorities decided that universities and other higher education institutions may resume campus-based teaching. We plan to do so from the fall of 2020. This also means that we have started planning to return to work on campus, obviously in a way that still follows the authorities’ recommendations regarding, for example, physical social distancing. Managers have been asked to develop a return plan for their department and these plans should be synchronized so that we ensure that not all employees work on campus to begin with. If the restrictions are eased and the authorities’ recommendations allow it, our hope and plan is to gradually increase the number of employees who can work on campus.
  • What is the employer’s responsibility regarding corona (COVID-19) and workplace safety?
    • As an employer, SSE is responsible for ensuring that the working environment is safe and secure. The employer’s responsibility also includes, if necessary, making risk assessments of situations or tasks that expose you or your colleagues to risks. We are taking steps to ensure a safe and secure workplace by, for example, planning for how many employees can be on campus at the same time, clarifying guidelines for common spaces, synchronizing return plans, increasing cleaning, and developing guidelines for when and how to be on campus.
  • I am worried about being infected at work and my employer wants me to work from there. What is applicable?
    • SSE is responsible for ensuring that the working environment is safe and secure. The employer’s responsibility also includes, if necessary, making risk assessments of situations or tasks that expose you or your colleagues to risks.

      We are taking steps to ensure a safe and secure workplace by, for example, planning for how many employees can be on campus at the same time, clarifying guidelines for common spaces, synchronizing return plans, increasing cleaning, and developing guidelines for when and how to be on campus.
  • I want to work from home, but my employer wants me to work from my physical workplace. Generally, working from home is encouraged – shouldn’t it be the same for everyone?
    • Your employer is required to continuously assess the working environment, not only for the entire group but also for each individual. It is therefore not possible to say that the same thing should apply to everyone since we all have different working conditions.

      In the current situation, employers should pay particular attention to risk groups and follow the recommendations of The Public Health Agency of Sweden (Folkhälsomyndigheten) on working from home.
  • I want to work from my physical workplace. What do I need to consider or think about?
    • Talk to your manager about what applies in your situation. From this fall, the hope is that we will partially return to work on campus. We are following the authorities’ recommendations on this. All situations are assessed individually on the basis of the risk of infection, risk groups, and SSE operations.

      When we work on campus, it is important to follow the recommendations and guidelines from authorities regarding, for example, physical social distancing and using public transportation. Authorities recommend avoiding rush hour traffic. If you have the opportunity to get to work by other means, this is recommended. If you need to use public transportation to get to work, consider whether you can travel at times other than during rush hour. Note that using public transportation is not prohibited and if your employer wants you to work on campus then you need to do so.
  • I belong to a risk group. What applies to me regarding working from home or from my physical workplace?
    • It is important to remember that you do not have the right to work from home, but we take great consideration of whether you are in a risk group and assess situations individually based on risk of infection, risk groups, and SSE operations. Contact your manager to discuss what applies to you. 
  • I live with one or more people who belong to a risk group. Do I have the right to work from home?
    • No, but you can talk to your manager to see if you can get permission to work from home. All situations are assessed individually based on the risk of infection, risk groups, and SSE operations.
  • Will SSE be offering COVID-19 testing for employees?
    • We will not be offering testing since we currently cannot ensure the reliability of the tests. This decision may change depending on how the situation develops.
  • My employer wants me to work from home but I don’t have a good workplace there. What is my employer’s responsibility when I work from home?
    • Your employer is responsible for ensuring that you have a good working environment even at home. For most people, working from home for a couple of days with a laptop works well. If you have to work from home for a longer period of time, then the employer needs to map your home working environment and what needs you have of different work-related tools.

      If you have special needs that mean you can’t work from home or require special tools, contact your manager or HR business partner and see if you can find a good solution.
  • Do I have to take sick leave if I have a slight cold? I’m losing money and can in fact work. It’s not possible for me to work from home.
    • Yes, you do. According to the Communicable Diseases Act (Smittskyddslagen), you must pay attention and take reasonable precautions to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. Anyone who knows or has reason to suspect that they are carrying an infectious disease is required to take the necessary measures to protect others against the risk of infection.

      The Public Health Agency of Sweden advises anyone with symptoms of a cold, even mild ones, to avoid contact with others, both at work and in their private lives.
  • What if I hurt myself when I’m working from home? Does the work-related injury insurance SSE has cover me?
    • The work-related injury insurance (TFA, TFA-KL and PSA) applies when you are working from home. Unlike working in the workplace, the injury must have a direct connection to the work you are performing. This means that you have been injured in the course of performing your duties. For example, if you injure yourself when you are making coffee in the kitchen, it is not considered a work-related injury, even if it happens during set working hours.
  • Am I entitled to compensation if I have to stay home from work?
    • You have the right to your salary if your employer decides that you should work from home or completely refrain from working without support from the Communicable Diseases Act. For example, this may be because the employer wants everyone to work from home for precautionary reasons.

      If you are absent from work due to compliance with the Communicable Diseases Act, such as if Swedish healthcare has determined that you are infected, then you can apply for the so-called disease carrier allowance from the Swedish Social Insurance Administration (Försäkringskassan). In this situation, your employer can make payroll deductions.
  • What if the preschool is closed and I need to stay home to take care of my child?
    • In this situation, your employer is not required to pay your salary. However, you may have the right to be on parental leave according to the Parental Leave Act. Other options may be that you and your employer reach an agreement that you will work from home, take a vacation, or take a leave of absence.
  • Do I need to stay home if someone in my family is sick?
    • According to The Public Health Agency of Sweden, you should stay home if you have symptoms yourself, but you do not need to stay home because someone else in your household is sick.
  • What does the fact that the government has temporarily suspended the deduction from sick pay mean?
    • This means that you get sick pay from day one if you get sick and need to stay home from work. On your salary specification, salary deductions will be made as usual and then you can apply retroactively to the Swedish Social Insurance Administration.

      The sick pay deduction is temporarily suspended as of March 11. If you are employed, you will receive SEK 700 before taxes as standard compensation. The amount will be raised to SEK 804 before taxes as of June 1. You must apply for compensation yourself from the Swedish Social Insurance Administration.

      You can find more information about the compensation and how you apply for it on the Swedish Social Insurance Administration’s corona website.
  • Have there been changes in the rules regarding doctor’s certificates?
    • Yes. If you reported that you were sick on March 13 or later, you do not need to submit a doctor’s certificate until after you have been sick for 21 days and apply for the sickness benefits payment. There are also changes regarding temporary decisions in sickness benefits payment. You can find more information about this on the Swedish Social Insurance Administration’s corona website.
  • What if I am put in quarantine during a trip abroad because of corona?
    • If you are quarantined during a private trip and for that reason are unable to return to work, then your employer is not obligated to pay your salary while you are absent.

      If the same thing happens during a business trip, then you are still entitled to your salary. In that case, you also have the right to a daily expense allowance.
  • Can I or my employer change or cancel a vacation that has already been granted?
    • Once you have applied for and been granted a vacation, you cannot change or cancel it. But you can always talk to your manager and see if you can reach an agreement.

      Your employer can cancel your vacation if there are very important reasons.

 

Guidelines for staff working from home and those on sick leave 

The purpose of these guidelines is to reduce the overall risk of infection and to reduce the risk of someone in a risk group being exposed to infection, for which SSE wishes to take extra responsibility. Guidelines and decisions can be reviewed and changed depending on how the situation develops. 

  • I don’t have any symptoms but would like to work from home, is that possible? 
    • We are following the Swedish authorities' recommendations (as of March 16) regarding this and recommend working from home, if the work that you perform on SSE premises is not critical to the everyday functions of the School. Contact your manager about what applies to you. All situations are assessed individually on the basis of infection risk, risk group and work tasks. You do not have the right to decide to work from home yourself. Note that decisions can be reconsidered and that it is important that you have a constant dialogue with your manager about what applies to you. 
  • I am working from home, how accessible do I need to be?
    • If you work from home you need to be reachable (for example by telephone, mail and other digital means) during regular working hours, unless you and your manager have agreed otherwiseSome roles may be critical and need to be on campus within a short amount of time. Consult with your direct manager if you are planning on being far from your workplace. The extraordinary situation we find ourselves in may mean that you will be asked to work on other work tasks for a period of time. 
  • What if I hurt myself when I work at home, does the occupational injury insurance from SSE cover me? 
    • For working from home, the work injury insurance (TFA, TFA-KL and PSA) applies. Unlike work in the workplace, the accident must have a direct connection with the work you are performing. This means that you have been injured in the course of performing your duties. For example, if you injure yourself when you are making coffee in the kitchen, it is not considered a work-related accident, even if it happens during a fixed working time.  
  • What should I do if I don’t feel 100% or feel unwell? 
    • If you feel unwell, but do not have any sick or mild cold symptoms, the basic rule is that you come to work unless you have agreed otherwise with your manager. However, we are following the Swedish authorities' recommendations (as of March 16) regarding this and recommend working from home, if the work that you perform on SSE premises is not critical to the everyday functions of the School. Contact your manager about what applies to you. If you are sick with a cold or a fever, you must take sick leave and wait until you are feeling well again (and are symptom-free for two days) before being on SSE premises.   
  • I have a sick child at home, what should I do if I stay at home to care for them? 
    • There are no changes in this situation, it should be reported as VAB.  
  • I am scheduled to work a shift at SSE but have cold symptoms. What should I do? 
    • If you have a cold or have symptoms of a cold/flu, you should take sick leave. 
  • How long do I have to stay at home if I've been sick? 
    • If you have been sick, you should wait until you feel well again and have two symptom-free days at home before being on SSE premises. 
  • I myself am in a risk group and/or live with a person who belongs to a risk group and I am worried about being infected/infecting the person I live with. Can I stay home and work?
    • We are following the Swedish authorities' recommendations (as of March 16) regarding this and recommend working from home, if the work that you perform on SSE premises is not critical to the everyday functions of the School. Contact your manager about what applies to you. All situations are assessed individually on the basis of infection risk, risk group and work tasks. You do not have the right to decide to work from home yourself. Note that decisions can be reconsidered and that it is important that you have a constant dialogue with your manager about what applies to you.
  • I am worried about my employment at SSE, who can I contact?
    • You can contact your direct manager or Charlotte Celsing, HR Director. Currently, we have no planned layoffs.

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