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Student Stories

What do our students and alumni think of the Wallenberg International Fellows Program?

Fellows 2019

The internship and studies at Georgetown are fantastic - but the Wallenberg Fellowship is so much more. What really stands out are the opportunities for personal development while learning from your peers and network of very inspiring people!
Agnes Nilsson

 

The Wallenberg International Fellows Program encouraged me to dare for more. It helped me choose the career path that reflects my interests and made it clear how to pursue it.
Diana Mustafina

 

From day one, the Wallenberg International Fellows Program has challenged me to think about my broader goals and values, inspiring me to explore how I can make the greatest impact in my career. Through the studies at Georgetown, internship, and just by living in Washington D.C., you constantly meet talented and ambitious people who want to make a difference in the world.
Simon Rothschild

Fellows 2018

The Wallenberg Fellowship is so much more than a semester abroad and a summer internship. It is a truly holistic program that is designed to empower each and every fellow to personal and professional growth. During your time in Washington D.C., the cohort really feels like your family. You live and study together, travel together and get to meet inspiring people from business, politics and research. Today, after only five cohorts, it has created a remarkable network of great and driven fellows (read: friends) that continue to support each other across several continents.
Aylin Shawkat
The Wallenberg Fellowship opened up so many opportunities for me and truly prepared me for a career in international business and developing finance. I am quite sure the fellowship—and the internship opportunity that came with it—is one of the main reasons as to why I was offered a position at the Swedish Development Finance Institution after graduating at SSE, enabling me to work with issues related to sustainable finance and the SDGs.
Agnes Magnusson

Fellows 2017

“The Wallenberg International Fellows Program was one of the main reasons for choosing Sweden and Stockholm School of Economics for my Master’s degree. It combines my interests in economics and international relations and prepares me for my future career by granting me access and insights into the world of policymaking and international institutions. Thus, it is the perfect conclusion to my studies in which I focused on public and development economics.”
Mats Kröger

The Wallenberg International Fellows Program was one of the main reasons for choosing Sweden and Stockholm School of Economics for my Master’s degree. It combines my interests in economics and international relations and prepares me for my future career by granting me access and insights into the world of policymaking and international institutions. Thus, it is the perfect conclusion to my studies in which I focused on public and development economics.

“To have the chance to gain relevant and special practical experience as well as to become part of the Wallenberg International Fellows Program’s unique network of like-minded individuals persuaded me in the end to move to Stockholm.”
Beatrice Gohdes

To have the chance to gain relevant and special practical experience as well as to become part of the Wallenberg International Fellows Program’s unique network of like-minded individuals persuaded me in the end to move to Stockholm.

“My aim has always been to focus my personal development on building a well-rounded set of experiences, life lessons, connections, professional challenges and relationships. The Wallenberg International Fellows Program excels on all these fronts.”
Agris Jomerts

My aim has always been to focus my personal development on building a well-rounded set of experiences, life lessons, connections, professional challenges and relationships. The Wallenberg International Fellows Program excels on all these fronts.

Fellows 2016

“Before starting at SSE, I had researched the Wallenberg International Fellows Program and understood that it was one of few, if not the only chance to supplement the economics courses taught in Stockholm with courses in diplomacy, public policy and international relations.”
Sebastian Röing

Before starting at SSE, I had researched the Wallenberg International Fellows Program and understood that it was one of few, if not the only chance to supplement the economics courses taught in Stockholm with courses in diplomacy, public policy and international relations.

“The Wallenberg International Fellows Program was the perfect opportunity to combine all of the aspects of my education and to enhance my theoretical as well as practical knowledge concerning the interdependencies and intersections between the private and public sector.” 
Alexa Straus

The Wallenberg International Fellows Program was the perfect opportunity to combine all of the aspects of my education and to enhance my theoretical as well as practical knowledge concerning the interdependencies and intersections between the private and public sector.

”I hoped the program would help me deepen my understanding of how to successfully leverage the strengths of governments, businesses and NGOs to bring about the change that I want to see in the world. Having gone through it, I can say that it did that and more.” 
Bensam Solomon

I hoped the program would help me deepen my understanding of how to successfully leverage the strengths of governments, businesses and NGOs to bring about the change that I want to see in the world. Having gone through it, I can say that it did that and more.

Fellows 2015

The Wallenberg Fellowship Program is meant to make you broaden your horizons, seeing more career choices you haven't contemplated before, and getting inspired by the sheer width of international organizations in D.C.
Hannes Tordengren

1. What aspects of the WIFP were you most appealed to?
The way it broadens the perspective from the often quite technical and theoretical subjects at SSE to the realm of international affairs and international business. It also opens the doors to some of the most recognized practitioners and scholars of actual policy making in D.C., where it seems the rest of the world is closer than in most other places.   

2. Tell us about the internship you’ve had this summer. Where were you situated and what did you get the chance to do/experience?
I spent the summer at the Peterson Institute of International Economics, working with the well-renowned Swedish economist Anders Åslund. I have done research and produced graphs and prepared material for several areas for his book on "How to fix Europe", a policy related book examining examples of successful European countries, tackling such demanding questions as how to create an environment inductive to innovation, how to curb unemployment, how to create a competitive tax system, get the pension system right and so on. At the Peterson Institute, I was in the midst of the ongoing debates about the Trans-Pacific Partnership which was negotiated in Congress during summer, as well as numerous events targeting the economic challenges Ukraine is facing to balance its budget as well as the economic effects sanctions are having on Russia.    

3. What will be most fun, but also challenging during the term?
I am looking forward to the various events aimed at giving us exposure to leaders in different areas which we will be participating in. I have already visited Freedom House, the World Bank and the World Resources Institute, as well as numerous think tanks in D.C. We are planning visits to the Capitol, the IMF as well as other organizations.

Most challenging I found climbing the North Dome in Yosemite National Park - more than 1000 meters in elevation gain. We took the opportunity of traveling there, spending 5 full days hiking, taking in the stunning vistas of Yosemite, with my favorite being Cloud's Rest with a view over the Half Dome. 

4. You’ve arrived quite recently, how does it feel?
D.C. is an active bee-hive in summer. It's a good time to be here, with concerts everywhere, tourists flocking around along the Mall, the iconic museum area with completely free of charge world class museums and countless people enjoying a beer in the sun for the mandatory happy hour. It's not only tourists who flock to D.C. - also interns from all over the U.S. come to try their luck for a summer in the intern-heavy capital. When you arrive new to a place, one of the most important things is to feel welcomed and be able to make new friends. After a couple of months in D.C., I have made many new friends and had an intense experience of the bustling capital of the U.S., now settling in for intense studies and many more new friends at Georgetown University.  

5. Any tips for those who are interested in applying?
Think outside of the box. The Wallenberg Fellowship Program is meant to make you broaden your horizons, seeing more career choices you haven't contemplated before, and getting inspired by the sheer width of international organizations in D.C. If you have an interest in international affairs and want to broaden your international profile, this is for you. 

6. Any other comments?
The Wallenberg Fellowship Program aims at nurturing future leaders, providing individualized assistance in finding an internship that fits your personal career plan, as well as organizing various activities throughout the semester aimed at further developing the participants' professional network.

There are so many people working internationally to bring positive change to developing countries! It's really inspiring to get to talk to policy makers, and discuss issues you'd normally read about on the front page of the Economist or Washington Post.
Marta Khomyn

1. What aspects of the WIFP were you most appealed to?
Doing an internship in the US before starting my studies at Georgetown University was certainly an incredibly valuable experience. Firstly, it allowed me to test my interest in the area of international development. Secondly, it helped a lot in setting priorities for course selection during the fall semester at Georgetown. Finally, it contributed to the steep learning curve and allowed me to add a practical touch to the course material covered in my Georgetown courses.

2. Tell us about the internship you’ve had this summer.
I interned at the World Bank, particularly at the Innovation Team of ICT & Transport Global Practice. I focused on developing the strategy for Rapid Technology Skills Development Project in the MENA (Middle East and North Africa) region and Latin America. I also contributed to Rwanda Broadband Infrastructure Project by developing a model for quantifying the impact of the project.  I learned a lot about coding boot camps, broadband in Africa, and World Bank operations.

3. What will be most fun, but also challenging during the term?
It was fun to experience the deep immersion into the incredibly lively development scene of Washington DC. There are so many people working internationally to bring positive change to developing countries! It's really inspiring to get to talk to policy makers, and discuss issues you'd normally read about on the front page of the Economist or Washington Post. The challenging part is to handle all the pressure coming from the variety of events you're exposed to. It's easy to lose focus among all the opportunities open to you.

4. You’ve arrived quite recently, how does it feel?
It feels good to catch up with friends we've made throughout the summer during our internships, and of course - to meet new friends at Georgetown!

5. Any tips for those who are interested in applying?
Think carefully through what the program can offer to your professional development. How is it aligned with your interests? Will it help you achieve your career goals? What motivates you to apply? Having a good grasp of the "why" behind your application will certainly help throughout the application process.

WIFP allowed me to complement my economics degree with a valuable international relations perspective, gained both through classes at a top US school and a summer internship.
Piotr Rozwalka

1. What aspects of the WIFP were you most appealed to?
WIFP allowed me to complement my economics degree with a valuable international relations perspective gained both through classes a top US school and a summer internship. Given my interests in global affairs, having a chance to experience and understand DC has been very thrilling. After all, DC is one of the most important centers for global politics and international civil society movements in the world.

2. Tell us about the internship you’ve had this summer.
I worked at a top natural resource think-tank, World Resources Institute, where I had a chance to co-author a working paper on cost/benefit analysis of improving community forest property rights. Firstly, it gave me a first-hand experience of how think-tanks operate and how their research contributes and tries to affect the public debate on crucial topics. Secondly, I could apply my economics knowledge to produce a publication at a renowned institution.

3. What will be most fun, but also challenging during the term?
The most fun part so far was a backpacking trip to Yosemite National Park and it will be hard to beat that. The biggest challenge has been to adapt to the DC culture and, in particular, to the importance that networking plays here. As with all the challenges, however, once overcome they enrich us and increase our experience and so I am extremely happy to develop myself in that area.

4. Any tips for those who are interested in applying?
DC offers a plethora of opportunities to jump at and organizations to get to know and acquaint oneself with. Make sure to do your homework and have a good plan with clear objectives of how to make the most out of your time here.

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