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One Hundred Years of Game Theory: Future Applications and Challenges

On December 19, 1921, the mathematician Emile Borel published a paper which laid the foundation of game theory. He offered a new framework for analysis in economics, political science, and other social and behavioral sciences. The centennial of this publication is a good occasion to ask where we may look today for the next breakthroughs that will be important for future economics and other social sciences, and for biology and computer science. What are the most promising directions for application? What are the most important challenges?

Speakers

Join this round table discussion with prominent Nobel Prize-winners, world leading researchers and practitioners within Game Theory. 

Register here!

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Éva Tardos

Professor of Computer Sciences at Cornell University
Holder of prestigous awards, such as the Gödel Prize

Photo: Cornell University

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Robert J. Aumann

Professor at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Awarded the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel in 2005. 

Photo: D. Porges

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Kaushik Basu

Professor of Economics and the C. Marks Professor of International Studies
Former Chief Economist & Senior Vice President of the World Bank

Photo: Cornell University

 

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Eric S. Maskin

Professor at Harvard University
Awarded the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel in 2007. 

© The Nobel Foundation Photo: U. Montan

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Roger B. Myerson

Professor at the University of Chicago
Awarded the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel in 2007 

©The Nobel Foundation Photo: U. Montan

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